100 days ago we marched.

We didn’t know it, but the march was only just the beginning.

Over these past 100 days, you have continued to show up. You have reaffirmed your commitment to women’s rights again and again. You have written countless letters to your elected officials demanding action. You have huddled, growing your activist community and enacting change at the local level. You have shown the World what a day without a woman looks like. You have attended vigils standing as a symbol of hope in the face of fear, division and hatred.

You have helped build a global women-led movement where women all over the World are working to affect change within their local communities. Women have stepped up and demanded that people #VoteAgainstHate in the Netherlands elections and in France after the first round of elections, we saw that #WomenHaveThePower.

More than ever, all over the World, women are using their voice to be the change.

We are excited to see what the future holds for Women’s March, and here in the UK where a General Election has been called for June 8, it is more important than ever that we continue to make our voices heard. 


ACTION 10/10
#HEAR OUR VOTE
On 8th June, let's make our voices heard.
 

In calling for a general election, Theresa May has handed us all a major opportunity. Let’s not waste it. This June 8, let’s make our voices heard once more.

It is important to recognise the power of our vote. By focusing on the upcoming General Election, we can help elect Members of Parliament who will fight for our values. Our power lies at the local level, the pipeline for higher offices.

FOR ACTION 10, WE ASK YOU TO:

  1. Register to vote

  2. Sign up for Women's March London Election Team, where we will be working with organisations such as Represent to learn and help get people within our communities engaged  and voting; and

  3. Spread the word!
     

We need MPs who represent and support our communities at every level. Let’s prepare now, so that over the coming 6 week election campaign, our local candidates hear our voice. Use the hashtag #HearOurVote on social media tell us you are ready.

Our voice. Our power. Our vote.

The politics of hate and division have no place in 2017.


lesfemmes.jpg
We wanted to take a moment to reflect on all that has happened since the march and celebrate some of the ways in which women have continued to keep the spirit of the march alive and work for change within their local communities.

Several women have graciously agreed to share their thoughts with us.

ELAINEA EMMOTT: I knew the March was happening, and it wasn’t until a nagging feeling on Friday 20th January 2017, that I actually decided I was going to go and take my son.  He isn’t comfortable in crowds or those situations where there are loud noises on account of being sensitive to noise as part of his condition on the Asperger’s Spectrum.  Since Brexit I had a feeling of foreboding that I just couldn’t shake, and after Trump getting sworn in as President of the United States, well I was in a state of anxiety about things turning bad, sour – that I knew deep down in my gut that I had to do something, however small. I was reminded in times during important history when communities had done nothing, through fear and I didn’t want that to be my legacy. You could sense the feeling of something important happening on the tube, and as more people boarded you just knew the amount of women and children coming on the tube that this was a moment in history. When we got off at Oxford Street, the crowd was something else. The people and their signs, young, old, men and sons, women and their daughters – I took pictures looking down on the escalator and it seemed natural to pick up my camera and record what I could see. As we shuffled around amidst singing and every turn seemed like a picture making a statement.  I felt really proud to be amongst so many spirited people who wanted to make a stand for equality and humanity. There was something in the air – we were reminded of the suffragettes, the sixties but also that we were moving into unchartered territory whereby standing up to be counted was really important. We followed the March dancing and smiling hearing the chanting and the amazing signage with humour and British wit and the helicopters circling ahead. I was very proud of my work and shared it with a photography group, only to have the abuse from a young male photographer who said ‘I had no place taking pictures like these’ and used abusive language.  This didn’t deter me, but I was shocked how my pictures were so powerful to make someone feel threatened. What is it about women marching that is so threatening? What is it about women finding their voice through solidarity that upsets?  Having witnessed so many women in different countries also marching I know the answer.  We are powerful, together and we can make political change. Since then I have been fearless. Very fearless.  I have discovered my voice in recording events and making beautiful images.  I have emerged as a documentary photographer as well as a fine art photographer providing beautiful images and I believe I can do both. I look back at the history of photography and know that these times are when I should, like many photographers before me, must go to work.  This is my job. This is why I am here. It is the single most important body of my work, and the strength and power of my pictures has made me believe in myself to pursue a career of photography.  And I read more. I listen to the news and make opinions for myself wanting to get to the heart of the matter –not fake news.  I have always been involved in charities, namely mental health and homelessness and I wanted my pictures to speak and tell a powerful message of ‘no more’ and to show others that even if they couldn’t make it that they could be there in spirit. I continue to work in this vein because I feel that the Women’s March London needed me and I needed them to find my visual voice so that vulnerable brothers and sisters, could all be vocally heard and visibly seen

ELAINEA EMMOTT:

I knew the March was happening, and it wasn’t until a nagging feeling on Friday 20th January 2017, that I actually decided I was going to go and take my son.  He isn’t comfortable in crowds or those situations where there are loud noises on account of being sensitive to noise as part of his condition on the Asperger’s Spectrum.  Since Brexit I had a feeling of foreboding that I just couldn’t shake, and after Trump getting sworn in as President of the United States, well I was in a state of anxiety about things turning bad, sour – that I knew deep down in my gut that I had to do something, however small. I was reminded in times during important history when communities had done nothing, through fear and I didn’t want that to be my legacy.

You could sense the feeling of something important happening on the tube, and as more people boarded you just knew the amount of women and children coming on the tube that this was a moment in history. When we got off at Oxford Street, the crowd was something else. The people and their signs, young, old, men and sons, women and their daughters – I took pictures looking down on the escalator and it seemed natural to pick up my camera and record what I could see.

As we shuffled around amidst singing and every turn seemed like a picture making a statement.  I felt really proud to be amongst so many spirited people who wanted to make a stand for equality and humanity. There was something in the air – we were reminded of the suffragettes, the sixties but also that we were moving into unchartered territory whereby standing up to be counted was really important.
We followed the March dancing and smiling hearing the chanting and the amazing signage with humour and British wit and the helicopters circling ahead.

I was very proud of my work and shared it with a photography group, only to have the abuse from a young male photographer who said ‘I had no place taking pictures like these’ and used abusive language.  This didn’t deter me, but I was shocked how my pictures were so powerful to make someone feel threatened. What is it about women marching that is so threatening? What is it about women finding their voice through solidarity that upsets?  Having witnessed so many women in different countries also marching I know the answer.  We are powerful, together and we can make political change.

Since then I have been fearless. Very fearless.  I have discovered my voice in recording events and making beautiful images.  I have emerged as a documentary photographer as well as a fine art photographer providing beautiful images and I believe I can do both. I look back at the history of photography and know that these times are when I should, like many photographers before me, must go to work.  This is my job. This is why I am here.

It is the single most important body of my work, and the strength and power of my pictures has made me believe in myself to pursue a career of photography.  And I read more. I listen to the news and make opinions for myself wanting to get to the heart of the matter –not fake news.  I have always been involved in charities, namely mental health and homelessness and I wanted my pictures to speak and tell a powerful message of ‘no more’ and to show others that even if they couldn’t make it that they could be there in spirit.

I continue to work in this vein because I feel that the Women’s March London needed me and I needed them to find my visual voice so that vulnerable brothers and sisters, could all be vocally heard and visibly seen

SAJEELA KERSHI: Being on the frontline of the Women's March London and having been asked to be a key speaker at the end of the march in Trafalgar square was an undeniably memorable experience. I would have been on the march irrespective - but the whole day changed me forever. I was there marching not only against the misogyny and bigotry of Trump and his administration but for many things, i like my sisters and brothers on that march had had enough, enough of racism, enough of sexism, enough of immigrant/refugee bashing, enough of seeing my white, black, brown, gay, christian, jewish, muslim sisters et al oppressed, controlled and denied a voice the world over....enough is enough! My entire written work this year has been a direct result of that day in January, a day that will live long in my memory when we the many made a difference - no matter that Trump is still in power that we are still reeling from the aftermath of Brexit and the rise of hate crimes - history will always show how we the people of the world united to say enough! My solo show I shall be taking to Edinburgh this year is called 'Fights like a girl' it was a banner behind me on the photo that went global, it's in part about being a BAME immigrant woman of muslim origin and Disability who's constantly fighting for her rights.The image for the show is of me on the frontline alongside Harriet Harman, Bonnie Greer and others-  I'm also taking my hit show 'Immigrant Diaries' which is more relevant than ever. Then a compilation show 'Nasty Women on the Fringe' the image is of Hillary clinton pointing as if to say 'Your sisterhood needs YOU' - it will showcase the 'nastiest' women at the fringe this year from all genres comedy, cabaret, theatre el al. Any shows/performers with a political/feminist bite. I've also been commissioned by the Southbank Alchemy Roadshow to devise and write a show - again inspired by the Women’s March I've chosen to take inspiration from the South Asian women's groups around the country - (these are vulnerable groups) but my cast and I will be fusing our own stories alongside monologues inspired by these incredible women. It does address the gender imbalance prevalent within my own community. I truly feel proud that I marched alongside so many wonderful women who have collectively inspired me creatively - I want to make work that can make a difference. Women's March London thank you so much for restoring my faith in humanity.

SAJEELA KERSHI:

Being on the frontline of the Women's March London and having been asked to be a key speaker at the end of the march in Trafalgar square was an undeniably memorable experience. I would have been on the march irrespective - but the whole day changed me forever. I was there marching not only against the misogyny and bigotry of Trump and his administration but for many things, i like my sisters and brothers on that march had had enough, enough of racism, enough of sexism, enough of immigrant/refugee bashing, enough of seeing my white, black, brown, gay, christian, jewish, muslim sisters et al oppressed, controlled and denied a voice the world over....enough is enough!

My entire written work this year has been a direct result of that day in January, a day that will live long in my memory when we the many made a difference - no matter that Trump is still in power that we are still reeling from the aftermath of Brexit and the rise of hate crimes - history will always show how we the people of the world united to say enough!

My solo show I shall be taking to Edinburgh this year is called 'Fights like a girl' it was a banner behind me on the photo that went global, it's in part about being a BAME immigrant woman of muslim origin and Disability who's constantly fighting for her rights.The image for the show is of me on the frontline alongside Harriet Harman, Bonnie Greer and others-  I'm also taking my hit show 'Immigrant Diaries' which is more relevant than ever. Then a compilation show 'Nasty Women on the Fringe' the image is of Hillary clinton pointing as if to say 'Your sisterhood needs YOU' - it will showcase the 'nastiest' women at the fringe this year from all genres comedy, cabaret, theatre el al. Any shows/performers with a political/feminist bite.

I've also been commissioned by the Southbank Alchemy Roadshow to devise and write a show - again inspired by the Women’s March I've chosen to take inspiration from the South Asian women's groups around the country - (these are vulnerable groups) but my cast and I will be fusing our own stories alongside monologues inspired by these incredible women. It does address the gender imbalance prevalent within my own community.

I truly feel proud that I marched alongside so many wonderful women who have collectively inspired me creatively - I want to make work that can make a difference. Women's March London thank you so much for restoring my faith in humanity.

CHARLIE MARIE: When I think back to the march and the things the WM Global have achieved in supporting Women’s Marches around the world I am reminded ‘Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." - Margaret Mead.   I helped to organise the Women’s March Southampton and the march inspired a wave of ideas and activism locally. We formed a Women’s March group in Southampton and held monthly meetings to challenge inequality both locally and globally. We have organised fundraising self defence classes and are working on lobbying and rallying against Trumps state visit this summer. We are also working towards encouraging people to register to vote and to turn up and vote in the upcoming general elections; we want people to participate in democracy so that their voices can be heard as loudly as the day we marched. We are always working on ways to be more inclusive, diverse and intersectional. We have held huddles and learned how to reflect and resist. We have listened to what members and local people have to say about their greatest concerns post Brexit and, what is clear is that people are concerned that about inequality and injustice.

CHARLIE MARIE:

When I think back to the march and the things the WM Global have achieved in supporting Women’s Marches around the world I am reminded ‘Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." - Margaret Mead.  


I helped to organise the Women’s March Southampton and the march inspired a wave of ideas and activism locally. We formed a Women’s March group in Southampton and held monthly meetings to challenge inequality both locally and globally. We have organised fundraising self defence classes and are working on lobbying and rallying against Trumps state visit this summer. We are also working towards encouraging people to register to vote and to turn up and vote in the upcoming general elections; we want people to participate in democracy so that their voices can be heard as loudly as the day we marched. We are always working on ways to be more inclusive, diverse and intersectional. We have held huddles and learned how to reflect and resist. We have listened to what members and local people have to say about their greatest concerns post Brexit and, what is clear is that people are concerned that about inequality and injustice.

PORTIA KAMONS (left): I was in New York City for the 2016 Election.  In the streets that afternoon the atmosphere fizzed with the energy of Hillary’s imminent victory and history in the making.  People were ebullient about the end of the most corrosive political campaign in living history.  I co-hosted an election watch party for a small group of beloved friends,  who huddled in nervous anticipation in front of the TV as  early, predicted, positive signs for Hillary gave way to a swing state tsunami of Republican red. We fell into silent, despairing disbelief, and stayed in that numbing funk through Thanksgiving (we sang songs and wept) Christmas (forced down like a stale donut) New Years Eve (Netflix) until we could finally endure the saddest inauguration of our lives. Then on January 21st, my husband and I woke up and gathered up a stack of signs we’d made for the Women's March.  Seeing us load into a minicab, a well meaning neighbor reminded me that we’re still living in a bubble as she quipped, “There’s a protest?  I didn’t know.  Have fun!”  Didn’t everyone in the world know this march was happening today?  And why?  Skepticism rose up and caught me in the throat. I had 50 signs to distribute.   What if there weren’t enough people to take them?  Too late to worry now, I thought. March on. I planned to meet my group at the Pain Quotidian near the US Embassy and we were just early enough to get through the ever-thickening crowds pouring down the street toward Grosvenor Square.  I met up and immediately lost my group of friends as the crowd swept them forward.  For the first time since November 8th, the atmosphere around us all was overwhelmingly positive.  The vibe was a life-affirming combination of passion, solidarity of purpose, confidence and sheer will to reclaim the conversation about our shared future.  Occasionally something would happen and the crowd would send a rippling roar rolling along its length. Like the roar after a winning goal in a sports stadium, but female.  I let that roar sink deep deep deep into the marrow of my bones so I could call on the memory during battles to come over these next four years.  An extraordinary, visceral, do-not-fuck-with-me roar of women who mean business. Whether they were conscious of it or not, anyone attending the march got a tank full from that roar. It gave us back our groove. The March gave momentum to women and the men who are our allies. Two women in my circle of friends are running for office, and more have rolled up their sleeves to lead through the long fight.  A friend in New York State who hasn’t yet announced her candidacy is taking on an odious Republican in the coming 2018 midterms. In the Oxfordshire council of Thame & Chinnor, the estimable Ali Gordon Creed is the Green candidate. Indra Adnan and Pat Kane are launching a new British political party, The Alternative. Samantha Roddick, a creative entrepreneur and artist who learned about activism from her groundbreaking mother, Anita, is hosting gatherings called “Conspiring and Inspiring for a Better Future.”  She is galvanizing citizens to be active participants in democracy, which I agree wholeheartedly is essential if we want it to survive. These initiatives give so many of us hope, and purpose.  We will not capitulate.  We march on.

PORTIA KAMONS (left):

I was in New York City for the 2016 Election.  In the streets that afternoon the atmosphere fizzed with the energy of Hillary’s imminent victory and history in the making.  People were ebullient about the end of the most corrosive political campaign in living history.  I co-hosted an election watch party for a small group of beloved friends,  who huddled in nervous anticipation in front of the TV as  early, predicted, positive signs for Hillary gave way to a swing state tsunami of Republican red. We fell into silent, despairing disbelief, and stayed in that numbing funk through Thanksgiving (we sang songs and wept) Christmas (forced down like a stale donut) New Years Eve (Netflix) until we could finally endure the saddest inauguration of our lives.

Then on January 21st, my husband and I woke up and gathered up a stack of signs we’d made for the Women's March.  Seeing us load into a minicab, a well meaning neighbor reminded me that we’re still living in a bubble as she quipped, “There’s a protest?  I didn’t know.  Have fun!”  Didn’t everyone in the world know this march was happening today?  And why?  Skepticism rose up and caught me in the throat. I had 50 signs to distribute.   What if there weren’t enough people to take them?  Too late to worry now, I thought. March on.

I planned to meet my group at the Pain Quotidian near the US Embassy and we were just early enough to get through the ever-thickening crowds pouring down the street toward Grosvenor Square.  I met up and immediately lost my group of friends as the crowd swept them forward.  For the first time since November 8th, the atmosphere around us all was overwhelmingly positive.  The vibe was a life-affirming combination of passion, solidarity of purpose, confidence and sheer will to reclaim the conversation about our shared future.  Occasionally something would happen and the crowd would send a rippling roar rolling along its length. Like the roar after a winning goal in a sports stadium, but female.  I let that roar sink deep deep deep into the marrow of my bones so I could call on the memory during battles to come over these next four years.  An extraordinary, visceral, do-not-fuck-with-me roar of women who mean business. Whether they were conscious of it or not, anyone attending the march got a tank full from that roar. It gave us back our groove.

The March gave momentum to women and the men who are our allies. Two women in my circle of friends are running for office, and more have rolled up their sleeves to lead through the long fight.  A friend in New York State who hasn’t yet announced her candidacy is taking on an odious Republican in the coming 2018 midterms. In the Oxfordshire council of Thame & Chinnor, the estimable Ali Gordon Creed is the Green candidate. Indra Adnan and Pat Kane are launching a new British political party, The Alternative. Samantha Roddick, a creative entrepreneur and artist who learned about activism from her groundbreaking mother, Anita, is hosting gatherings called “Conspiring and Inspiring for a Better Future.”  She is galvanizing citizens to be active participants in democracy, which I agree wholeheartedly is essential if we want it to survive. These initiatives give so many of us hope, and purpose.  We will not capitulate.  We march on.

AISHA ALI-KHAN : In January, Shipley Feminist Zealots worked to organise Women’s March Shipley. Shipley Feminist Zealots began last August, as a one-off cake stall by people in Shipley who were fed up with local MP’s sexist views, rudeness to constituents and embarrassing behaviour in parliament. The cake, and our name, was a tongue-in-cheek reference to a mean-spirited speech that Philip Davies gave at a Justice for Men and Boys conference. We decided to reclaim the names he called us, and to invite everyone in Shipley to have their cake and eat it while learning about what kind of man our MP really is.   That first action was women-led, but everyone was welcome, and we attracted overwhelming support. Around 60 people showed up to help with the cake stall and we spoke to hundreds of people in Shipley market square that day. One of the women campaigning with us remarked that what made it so engaging, was that it wasn’t about party politics and confrontational debate, but cake and conversation. We thought that seemed like a pretty good starting point for a grassroots movement of Shipley feminists, people of all parties and none, who want to hold our elected representative to account. For us, it’s not just about what Philip Davies says or does in parliament to grab headlines, it’s about meaningful change for people in Shipley. In January we organised Women’s March Shipley which had 1,500 people. This was followed in February by a public meeting with Philip Davies, in which a diverse panel of women and a large audience challenged his views on domestic and honour-based violence, support for carers, sex and relationship education, the employment rights of people with disabilities, his links to the gambling industry, and the language he directs towards constituents in private correspondence. During the election campaign SFZ will hold cake stalls where we will talk to local people about politics, equality and Philip Davies’ track record. We will use this opportunity to raise money for underfunded refuge and mental health services. We will reach out across the constituency to promote voter-registration and turnout. We will organise a hustings that is friendly and accessible, particularly to women, and encourage meaningful conversation. Whoever wins the election, we will still be here in Shipley and we will continue to hold them to account.

AISHA ALI-KHAN :

In January, Shipley Feminist Zealots worked to organise Women’s March Shipley.

Shipley Feminist Zealots began last August, as a one-off cake stall by people in Shipley who were fed up with local MP’s sexist views, rudeness to constituents and embarrassing behaviour in parliament. The cake, and our name, was a tongue-in-cheek reference to a mean-spirited speech that Philip Davies gave at a Justice for Men and Boys conference. We decided to reclaim the names he called us, and to invite everyone in Shipley to have their cake and eat it while learning about what kind of man our MP really is.  

That first action was women-led, but everyone was welcome, and we attracted overwhelming support. Around 60 people showed up to help with the cake stall and we spoke to hundreds of people in Shipley market square that day. One of the women campaigning with us remarked that what made it so engaging, was that it wasn’t about party politics and confrontational debate, but cake and conversation.

We thought that seemed like a pretty good starting point for a grassroots movement of Shipley feminists, people of all parties and none, who want to hold our elected representative to account. For us, it’s not just about what Philip Davies says or does in parliament to grab headlines, it’s about meaningful change for people in Shipley.

In January we organised Women’s March Shipley which had 1,500 people. This was followed in February by a public meeting with Philip Davies, in which a diverse panel of women and a large audience challenged his views on domestic and honour-based violence, support for carers, sex and relationship education, the employment rights of people with disabilities, his links to the gambling industry, and the language he directs towards constituents in private correspondence.

During the election campaign SFZ will hold cake stalls where we will talk to local people about politics, equality and Philip Davies’ track record. We will use this opportunity to raise money for underfunded refuge and mental health services. We will reach out across the constituency to promote voter-registration and turnout. We will organise a hustings that is friendly and accessible, particularly to women, and encourage meaningful conversation.
Whoever wins the election, we will still be here in Shipley and we will continue to hold them to account.

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Thank you for supporting and working with us over the last 100 days.

This is only the beginning.

 

LET'S SHOW THE WORLD OUR MOVEMENT IS NOT STOPPING. 


USEFUL TOOLS :

WRITE TO AMBER RUDD, HOME SECRETARY & MP:
Amber Rudd
Swallow House
Theaklen Drive
Hastings
St Leonards on Sea
East Sussex, TN38 9AZ
Tel: 01424 716756

or email her HERE

WRITE TO THE PRIME MINISTER:
Mrs. Theresa May
10 Downing Street,
SW1A 2AA

or email her HERE

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